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All Journal KUKILA TREUBIA
Frank E Rheindt
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Published : 3 Documents
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First Nest and Egg Description of the New Guinea Bronzewing Henicophaps albifrons and its Phylogenetic Significance Rheindt, Frank E
KUKILA Vol 14 (2009)
Publisher : KUKILA

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First Nest and Egg of the Seram Mountain-Pigeon Gymnophaps stalkeri of Maluku Hutchinson, Robert O; Rheindt, Frank E
KUKILA Vol 14 (2009)
Publisher : KUKILA

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NEW AND SIGNIFICANT ISLAND RECORDS, RANGE EXTENSIONS AND ELEVATIONAL EXTENSIONS OF BIRDS IN EASTERN SULAWESI, ITS NEARBY SATELLITES, AND TERNATE Rheindt, Frank E; Prawiradilaga, Dewi Malia; Suparno, Suparno; Ashari, Hidayat; Wilton, Peter R
TREUBIA Vol 41 (2014): Vol. 41, December 2014
Publisher : Research Center for Biology

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (221.836 KB) | DOI: 10.14203/treubia.v41i0.458

Abstract

The Wallacean Region continues to be widely unexplored even in such relatively well-known animal groups as birds (Aves). We report on the results of an ornithological expedition from late Nov 2013 through early Jan 2014 to eastern Sulawesi and a number of satellite islands (Togian, Peleng, Taliabu) as well as Ternate. The expedition targeted and succeeded with the collection of 7–10 bird taxa previously documented by us and other researchers but still undescribed to science. In this contribution, we provide details on numerous first records of bird species outside their previously known geographic or elevational ranges observed or otherwise recorded during this expedition. We also document what appears to be a genuinely new taxon, possibly at the species level of kingfisher from Sulawesi that has been overlooked by previous ornithologists. Our results underscore our fragmentary knowledge of the composition of the avifauna of eastern Indonesia, and demonstrate that there continues to be a high degree of cryptic, undescribed avian diversity on these islands more than a century and a half after they were visited by Alfred Russel Wallace and other collectors.