T Pasaribu
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Utilization of palm oilsludge in poultry diet: 3. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in broiler’s diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, Tatty; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.124 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.226

Abstract

Drying proces, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of broiler chickens when fed with ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge(FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10, and 15% equally to dried FPOS) were formulated with similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each diet was fed to 30 broiler chickens (5 replicates of 6 birds) for 5 weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, and mortalities) of chickens were recorded. Carcass percentage and abdominal fat content was also measured at the end of feeding trial. Data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance in a completely randomized design and different between means were tested by orthogonal contrast procedures. Results of the experiment showed that body weight gain (BWG) of control birds was not significantlydifferent with BWG of birds fed with FPOS. Birds fed with dried FLS gain more weight  than those fed with fresh FPOS (1048 vs 981 g/bird). Increasing of dietary FPOS levels decreased BWG, but 10% inclusion was still tolerable. Feed consumption of control diet was significantly (P<0.05) less than feed consumption of diet with FPOS. Increasing of dried FPOS to 15% did not affect feed consumption, but increasing of fresh FPOS significantly increased feed consumption. Feed conversion (FCR) of control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diet (2.07 vs 2.13). Increasing levels of dried FPOS from 5 to 10% did not affect the FCR, but further increasing to 15% significantly worsen the FCR. Increasing of fresh FPOS from 5 to 10 or 15 significantly worsen the FCR. Dry matter intake, mortalities, carcass percentage, liver weight, and abdominal fat levels of broilers were not significantly affected by dietary treatments (P>0.05). Conversion of feed dry matter to body weight gain of control diet was not significantly (P>0.05) different with those diets with FPOS. However, dry matter conversion of dried FPOS was significantly better than the fresh FPOS. Increasing levels of FLS from 5 to 15 significantly worsen the feed dry matter conversion but not with inclusion of 10% FPOS. Therefore, it is concluded that there is no superior advantage of feeding fresh FPOS as compared with dried FPOS. Inclusion of 10% dried or fresh FPOS in the diets did not affect growth performances of broiler chickens.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, dried, fermented, broilers
The utilization of rock phosphate (natural defluorinated calcium phosphate or NDCP) in laying hens diet to replace dicalcium phosphate Sinurat, A.P; Dharsana, R; Pasaribu, T; Panggabean, T; Habiebie, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.53

Abstract

An experimentwas conducted to study the utilization of local rock phosphate or natural defluorinated calcium phosphate (NDCP) as phosphorus source for layer chickens by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as a reference. Eight experimental diets consisted of 2 source of phosphorus (DCP and NDCP) and 4 dietary total P levels (0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7%) were formulated. Each diet was fed to 24 pullets (6 replicates with 4 birds each) from 20 weeks of age to 14 weeks of egg production. Observations were made on feed consumption, egg production, egg weight, mortality, egg quality, Ca and P retention and ash content of tibial bones . Results showed no significant effect of different source and level of phosphorus tested on egg production (% HD), feed consumption, egg weight and mortality rates . Egg shell thickness was depressed in NDCP diet as compared with DCP, however this only occurred at firstmonth of production. It is concluded that the NDCP can be used in layers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source. The relative biological value of phosphorus inNDCP is 96% for layers. Keywords: Rock phosphate, NDCP, layers, phosphorous (NDCP) as phosphorus source for layer chickens by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as a reference. Eight experimental diets consisted of 2 source of phosphorus (DCP and NDCP) and 4 dietary total P levels (0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7%) were formulated. Each diet was fed to 24 pullets (6 replicates with 4 birds each) from 20 weeks of age to 14 weeks of egg production. Observations were made on feed consumption, egg production, egg weight, mortality, egg quality, Ca and P retention and ash content of tibial bones . Results showed no significant effect of different source and level of phosphorus tested on egg production (% HD), feed consumption, egg weight and mortality rates . Egg shell thickness was depressed in NDCP diet as compared with DCP, however this only occurred at firstmonth of production. It is concluded that the NDCP can be used in layers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source. The relative biological value of phosphorus inNDCP is 96% for layers. Keywords: Rock phosphate, NDCP, layers, phosphorous
The utilization of rock phosphate (natural defluorinated calcium phosphate or NDCP) in laying hens diet to replace dicalcium phosphate Sinurat, A.P; Dharsana, R; Pasaribu, T; Panggabean, T; Habiebie, A
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 2 (1996)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (801.12 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i2.54

Abstract

An experimentwas conducted to study the utilization of local rock phosphate or natural defluorinated calcium phosphate (NDCP) as phosphorus source for layer chickens by using the imported dicalcium phosphate (DCP) as a reference. Eight experimental diets consisted of 2 source of phosphorus (DCP and NDCP) and 4 dietary total P levels (0.4, 0.5, 0.6 and 0.7%) were formulated. Each diet was fed to 24 pullets (6 replicates with 4 birds each) from 20 weeks of age to 14 weeks of egg production. Observations were made on feed consumption, egg production, egg weight, mortality, egg quality, Ca and P retention and ash content of tibial bones . Results showed no significant effect of different source and level of  phosphorus tested on egg production (% HD), feed consumption, egg weight and mortality rates . Egg shell thickness was depressed in NDCP diet as compared with DCP, however this only occurred at firstmonth of production. It is concluded that the NDCP can be used in layers diet to replace DCP as phosphorus source. The relative biological value of phosphorus inNDCP is 96% for layers.   Keywords: Rock phosphate, NDCP, layers, phosphorous
The application of feeding standard on weaned exotic pigs productivity Aritonang, Djamuara; Silalahi, M; Pasaribu, T; Batubara, L.P; Manihuruk, K; Doloksaribu, M
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 2, No 3 (1997)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (572.127 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v2i3.65

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to evaluate the application of feeding standard on performances of weaned pigs . The experiment used 24 weaned exotic pigs aged 6 weeks averaged body weight 10 .7 kg for 14 weeks observation. Three different diets i .e . farmers formula (R), commercial diet (K) and standard diet according to NRC recommendation (S) were evaluated . The results showed that S diet on pigs produced better growth rate, feed consumption, feed conversion, cost and profit than other diets and K diet produced better feed conversion than R diet. Carry over effect of the treatments on the growth rate, feed conversion, cost and profit showed that pigs received S diet performed better than those received other diets . But,R diet gave the lowest cost and higher profit than Kdiet. These results concluded that S diet produced the best performance and profitable and produced carry over effect on pigs performances and can be recommended to farmers .   Keywords : Feeding standard, exotic pig
Nutritive value of fermented coconut meal in ration of laying ducks with various phosphorous levels Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Habiebie, A; Pasaribu, T; Hamid, H; Rosida, J; Haryati, T; Sutikno, I
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 1 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (697.545 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i1.88

Abstract

A series of experiment was conducted to improve the utilization of coconut meal in poultry ration . A bioprocess (fermentation) approach was adopted. Coconut meal was fermented followed by an enzymatic process at room temperature or 50 OC.The nutritive value of the fermented products was determined chemically. Product with the highest nutritive value was then used for a feeding trial to study the interaction effect between dietary levels of fermented coconut meal and phosphorous level on the performances of laying ducks. Nine experimental diets were formulated, i.e ., the factorial of 3 levels of fermented coconut meal (0, 30 and 40%) and 3 levels of total phosphorous (0.6, 0.8 and 1 .0%) . The diet was fed to pullet ducks and the performances of the ducks were observed for 16 weeks of production period. The results showed that the nutritive value of coconut meal increased by fermentation and the highest yield was achieved when the enzymatic process was performed at 500C. There was no significant interaction effect between dietary fermented coconut meal levels and the phosphorous levels on all parameters observed, except on egg weight. Inclusion of fermented coconut meal in the ration up to 30% did not produce negative effects on the productivity oflaying ducks, however, higher levels (40%) ofinclusion reduced the egg size   Keywords: Coconut meal, fermentation, ducks, egg production
Solid state fermentation of palm kernel meal by using Aspergillus niger ., Supriyati; Pasaribu, T; Hamid, H; Sinurat, A.P
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 3, No 3 (1998)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (152.824 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v3i3.112

Abstract

The solid state fermentation technique on palm kernel meal by using Aspergillus niger wild type and NRRL 337 was studied. The fermentation was carried out at 30oC for 3 days continued with enzymatic process at room temperature and 40oC for 2 days. The result showed that at the third days of fermentation spores started to grow on the surface. The 3rd days fermentation can improve protein content and in vitro digestibility (IVDMD) with minimal loss of dry matter. The dry matter contents at 3 days fermentation were 48.88 and 48.83% for product using Aspergillus niger wild type and NRRL 337. Combination 3 days fermentation and 2 days enzymatic process at room temperature by using Aspergillus niger NRRL 337 type gave the best product with optimal IVDMD value and protein digestibility of 51.47 and 71.33%.   Key words : Palm kernel meal, fermentation, Aspergillus niger
kernel meal and its fermented product for growing ducks Bintang, I.A.K; Sinurat, A.P; Murtisari, T; Pasaribu, T; Purwadaria, T; Haryati, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 4, No 3 (1999)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v4i3.156

Abstract

A series of experiment was carried out to evaluate the use of palm kernel meal and its fermented product in the ration of growing ducks. Treatments were arranged in a 2x3 factorial experiment, i.e. the combination between two processes (unfermented and fermented palm kernel meal) and three levels of ingredients in the diet (5, 10 and 15%). Four replicates were applied for each treatment, with 8 ducklings in each replicate. A control diet with no palm kernel meal was also formulated. All diets were formulated to have a similar protein and ME contents. Results of the experiment showed that fermentation process increased the nutrient composition (crude protein, true protein, phosphorus, and the metabolizable energy) and reduced its fibre and fat content. The feeding trial showed that neither the fermentation process, levels of ingredients nor the interactions of the two factors affected final body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, carcass percentage and abdominal fat of the ducklings significantly. It is concluded that fermentation process improved the nutritional value of palm kernel meal and the inclusion of palm kernel meal (unfermented and fermented), up to 15% in the diet of ducks did not negatively affect the growthperformance and the carcass yield.   Key words : Ducks, palm kernel meal, fermentation
Nutritive value of palm oil sludge fermentation by some incubation process I.A.B, Bintang; Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 5, No 1 (2000)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (126.532 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v5i1.173

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of fermented palm oil sludge (PaS) incubated with different ways towards metabolic digestibility on dry matter,true metabolizable energy (TME) and protein digestibilities. A completely randomized design was used. Treatments consisted of unfermented pas (control) and fermented pas with and without enzymatic incubation proces, two levels of incubation temperatures (28°C and 32°C) and three levels of incubation times (3, 4 and 5 days). The digestibility studies were carried out in 46 layer. The results showed that the dry matter digestibility of P_S was not significantly affected by fermentation process neither by incubation times. TME was not affected by fermentation process and incubation times, but it was significantly affected by incubation temperatures during fennentation (P<0,05). Incubation temperatures at 3rC more significant than 28°C. Enzimatic process was more significant than without enzimatic process. True metabolizable energy was highly significantly affected by enzimatic process (P<O,OI). Protein digestibility was highly significantly affected by time and incubation process (P<O,Ol), but not significantly affected by temperatures incubation. It was concluded that fermentation process could improve the digestibility of palm oil sludge (paS). The best result obtained from incubation at 32°C for 3 days and continued by enzimatic process.   Key words: Fennentation, nutritive value, palm oil sludge
Utilization of palm oilsludge in poultry diet: 3. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in broiler’s diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, Tatty; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 2 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (134.124 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.226

Abstract

Drying proces, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of broiler chickens when fed with ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge(FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10, and 15% equally to dried FPOS) were formulated with similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each diet was fed to 30 broiler chickens (5 replicates of 6 birds) for 5 weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion, and mortalities) of chickens were recorded. Carcass percentage and abdominal fat content was also measured at the end of feeding trial. Data obtained were subjected to analysis of variance in a completely randomized design and different between means were tested by orthogonal contrast procedures. Results of the experiment showed that body weight gain (BWG) of control birds was not significantlydifferent with BWG of birds fed with FPOS. Birds fed with dried FLS gain more weight  than those fed with fresh FPOS (1048 vs 981 g/bird). Increasing of dietary FPOS levels decreased BWG, but 10% inclusion was still tolerable. Feed consumption of control diet was significantly (P<0.05) less than feed consumption of diet with FPOS. Increasing of dried FPOS to 15% did not affect feed consumption, but increasing of fresh FPOS significantly increased feed consumption. Feed conversion (FCR) of control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diet (2.07 vs 2.13). Increasing levels of dried FPOS from 5 to 10% did not affect the FCR, but further increasing to 15% significantly worsen the FCR. Increasing of fresh FPOS from 5 to 10 or 15 significantly worsen the FCR. Dry matter intake, mortalities, carcass percentage, liver weight, and abdominal fat levels of broilers were not significantly affected by dietary treatments (P>0.05). Conversion of feed dry matter to body weight gain of control diet was not significantly (P>0.05) different with those diets with FPOS. However, dry matter conversion of dried FPOS was significantly better than the fresh FPOS. Increasing levels of FLS from 5 to 15 significantly worsen the feed dry matter conversion but not with inclusion of 10% FPOS. Therefore, it is concluded that there is no superior advantage of feeding fresh FPOS as compared with dried FPOS. Inclusion of 10% dried or fresh FPOS in the diets did not affect growth performances of broiler chickens.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, dried, fermented, broilers
Utilization of palm oil sludge in poultry diet. 4. Inclusion of fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge in native chickens diet Sinurat, A.P; Purwadaria, T; Pasaribu, T; Darma, J; Bintang, I.A.K; Togatorop, M.H
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 3 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i3.242

Abstract

Fermentation processes increase the protein of palm oil sludge and produce some useful enzymes. However, drying process, especially with heating often affects the nutritive values of feed ingredients and the enzymes activity. Therefore, this experiment was designed to study the responses of native chickens when fed ration containing fresh or dried fermented palm oil sludge(FPOS). Experimental diets with different levels of fresh or dried FPOS (5, 10 and 15% equal to dried FPOS) were  formulatedwith similar nutrient contents. A control diet with no FPOS was also included. Each treatment was replicated 5  times for 12weeks. Performances (body weight, feed consumption, feed conversion and mortality) of chickens were  recorded. Carcass yield,abdominal fat content, weight of liver and gizzard were measured at the end of feeding trial. Data  were subjected to analysis ofvariance and different between means were tested by orthogonal procedures. Results during the  starting period showed that,chickens fed FPOS diet gain more weight significantly than the control birds (298.1 vs. 264.7).  The dry matter intake of the dryFPOS diet was significantly better than the fresh FPOS diet (2.88 vs. 3.32). The FPOS  dietary levels did not affect body weightgain and dry matter intake of native chickens, significantly. However, increasing the  FPOS levels worsen the dry matterconversion (DCR) significantly. Data during 12 weeks trial showed mat the body weight  gain was not significantly affected bytreatments. The dry matter intake of the FPOS diets were significantly higher than the  control diet (3469 vs. 3065 g/bird), hencethe DCR of the control diet was significantly better than the FPOS diets (3.28 vs.  3.62). Feeding dry FPOS resulted in a betterDCR as compared to fresh FPOS (3.48 vs. 3.76), but not affected the dry matter  intake. The FPOS dietary levels did not affectbody weight gain and dry matter intake of native chickens, significantly.  However, inclusion of 5% FPOS in me diet gave betterDCR significantly, as compared with 15% FPOS (3.51 vs. 3.83).  Feeding dry or fresh FPOS (5 - 15%) did not significantlyaffect the mortality, carcass yield, abdominal fat levels, weight of  liver and weight of gizzard of native chickens. It is concludedthat dry FPOS was better than the fresh FPOS and could be  included in me native chickens diet up to 10%.   Key words: Palm oil sludge, fermentation, native chickens