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Journal : REFLEKSI

The Objection to The Claim of Meeting The Prophet Muḥammad in a State of Awakedness According to Muḥammad al-Shinqīṭī Muthalib, Abdul
Refleksi Vol 13, No 3 (2012): Refleksi
Publisher : Faculty of Ushuluddin Syarif Hidayatullah Islamic State University

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Abstract

This paper deals with the reaction of al-Shinqīṭī towards this latter way of mystical vision, particularly in the case of Aḥmad al-Tijānī. For al-Shinqīṭī, sufis’ claim of having a fully consciousness physical contact with the Prophet after his death is impossible because nothing, whether religious or rational proofs, can sustain it. The extreme case of such claim is expressed by Aḥmad al-Tijānī who, insists that a sufi (ṣūfī) can really see the Prophet with his physical eyes. In al-Tijānī’s opinion, the ability of the physical eyes to see the Prophet when awake was a common trait of those who attained the status of pole (quṭb).DOI: 10.15408/ref.v13i3.902
Abū Bakr Ibn al-‘Arabī: The Defender of Ash‘arism Muthalib, Abdul
Refleksi Vol 17, No 2 (2018): Refleksi
Publisher : Faculty of Ushuluddin Syarif Hidayatullah Islamic State University

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Abstract

This paper deals with Abū Bakr Ibn al-‘Arabī’s Ash‘arite theological perspective. He chose to adopt Ash‘arism because he believes that God chose certain figures to safeguard religion and the most important one among them is Abu al-Hasan al-Ash‘arī from whom correct theology spread from one generation of disciples to another. His education at Nidhamiyya College and Abu Hamid al-Ghazali’s tutorship might also be responsible for his preference for Ash‘arism. However, even though he was al-Ghazali’s student, he was not attracted by Sufism, instead keeping his focus on theology. He objected to Sufism for two defects he perceived it to possess. First is Sufis’ references to fake Hadiths and second the Sufi practice of self-mortification. As a devoted Ash‘arite, he consistently opposes the anthropomorphic interpretation of God’s nature espoused by the Hanbalites and the Dhahirite.