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218
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Factors Associated with the Occurrence of Osteoarthritis: A Path Analysis Evidence from Surakarta, Central Java

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Musculoskeletal conditions are an important public health problem. The population burden from arthritis is considerable. The implications of this burden are poor quality of life, restrictions in daily activities, and disability. This study aimed to analyze factors associated with the occurrence of osteoarthritis in Surakarta, Central Java, using a path analysis model.Subjects and Method: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta, Central Java, in June 2018. A sample of 200 patients was selected by fixed disease sampling, consisting of 50 knee OA patients and 150 patients without knee OA. The dependent variable was knee OA. The dependent variables were age, gender, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus, history of injury, and physical activity. Data on knee OA, BMI, and diabetes mellitus status were obtained from medical record. The other variables were measured by questionnaire. The data were analyzed by path analysis.Results: The risk of OA increased with diabetes mellitus (b=1.04; 95% CI= 0.17 to 1.92; p=0.020), older age (b= 4.03; 95% CI= 1.97 to 6.09; p<0.001), and BMI ≥25 (b= 1.28; 95% CI= 0.39 to 2.17; p= 0.005). The risk of OA decreased with history of knee injury (b= -0.90; 95% CI= 0.57 to 1.74; p= 0.003) and female (b= -1.19; 95% CI= -2.06 to -0.31; p=0.008). The risk of OA was indirectly affected by physical activity, female gender, and BMI.Conclusion: The risk of OA increases with diabetes mellitus, older age, and BMI ≥25, but decreases with history of knee injury and female gender.The risk of OA is indirectly affected by physical activity, female gender, and BMI.Keywords: knee osteoarthritis, sociodemographic factor, diabetes mellitus, path analysisCorrespondence:Mei Kusumaningtyas. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: meikusumaningtyas@gmail.com. Mobile : +6285725646444Epidemiology and Public Health (2019), 4(1): 9-19https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2019.04.01.02

Analysis of the Contextual Effect of Village Characteristics and Other Determinants of Diarrhea in Children Under Five, Banjarnegara, Central Java

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 3, No 3 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Diarrheal disease is the leading cause of child death and illness in the world. Diarrhea is one of the most potent endemic diseases in Indonesia. Children under five were the most affected group by this disease. This study aimed to determine the effect of nutritional status, information exposure, prevention behavior, income, social capital, and environmental sanitation on the incidence of diarrhea in children under five in Banjarnegara District, Central Java, using multilevel analysis.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a case-control design. The study was conducted in Banjarnegara, Central Java, from January to February 2018. A total of 25 villages was selected using stratified random sampling, based on village stratification criteria. A sample of 250 children under five was selected for this study by fixed disease sampling, consisting of 125 children with diarrhea and 125 healthy children. The dependent variable was diarrhea. The independent variables at level 1 were nutritional status, information exposure, prevention behavior, income, social capital, and environmental sanitation. Village stratification was used as the contextual factor at level 2. The data were collected by a set of pre-tested questionnaire and analyzed by multilevel logistic regression analysis using Stata 13.Results: Poor nutritional status (b= 1.33; 95% CI= -0.14 to 2.82; p= 0.077), poor prevention behavior (b= 1.52; 95% CI= 0.81 to 2.24; p<0.001), low income (b= 1.52; 95% CI= 0.80 to 2.25; p<0.001), weak social capital (b= 1.80; 95 % CI= 1.04 to 2.56; p<0.001), and poor environmental sanitation (b= 1.12; 95% CI= 0.39 to 1.85; p= 0.003) increased the risk of diarrhea. Exposure to information (b= 0.90; 95% CI= 0.17 to 1.64; p= 0.015) decreased the risk of diarrhea. The village stratification showed a strong contextual effect on the incidence of diarrhea with intra-class correlation (ICC)= 15.78%.Conclusion: Poor nutritional status, poor personal hygiene, low income, weak social capital, and poor environmental sanitation increase the risk of diarrhea.Keywords: determinant, diarrhea, children under five, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Lusia Arina Cahyaningrum. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36 A, Surakarta, Indonesia. Email: lusiaarina@gmail.com. Mobile: +6282226835687.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health (2018), 3(3): 342-352https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2018.03.03.05

Logistic Regression on Factors Affecting Depression among the Elderly

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Mental health problems, especially depression, have a major impact on the elderly. Depression is a major contributor to the burden of disease globally which can cause suicide. This study aimed to determine the factors that influence depression in the elderly.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a cross-sectional design. It was conducted from October to December 2018. A total of 200 elderly was selected by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was depression. The independent variables were income, history of chronic illness, family function, social interaction, social support, social isolation, and loneliness. Data on depression was measured by Geriatric Depression Scale 15 (GDS-15). The other data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by multiple logistic regression.Results: The risk of depression in elderly increased with history of chronic illness (OR= 8.03; 95% CI= 1.48 to 43.42; p= 0.016), social isolation (OR= 6.05; 95% CI= 1.41 to 25.98; p= 0.015), and loneliness (OR= 7.14; 95% CI= 1.62 to 31.41; p= 0.009). It decreased with high income (OR= 0.14; 95% CI= 0.03 to 0.60; p= 0.008), strong family function (OR= 0.13; 95% CI= 0.02 to 0.67; p= 0.014), strong social interaction (OR= 0.11; 95% CI= 0.02 to 0.48; p= 0.003), and strong social support (OR= 0.16; 95% CI= 0.04 to 0.65; p= 0.011).Conclusion: The risk of depression in the elderly increases with a history of chronic illness, social isolation, and loneliness. It decreases with high income, strong family function, strong social interaction, and strong social support.Keywords: depression, elderly, income, chronic illness, family function, social factors, lonelinessCorrespondence: Christiana Sri Wahyuningsih. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta, Indonesia. Email:anachristi19@gmail.com.Mobile: +6281287783924.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health, 2019, 4(3): 171-179https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2019.04.03.03

The Contextual Effect of Village on Health Preventive Behavior for Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever in Pati, Central Java

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 4, No 3 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Dengue is a mosquito-borne infection that has emerged to become a major public health issue and can result in death. Various efforts have been made as an attempt to empower the community in dengue preventive behavior, but has not yet reached the optimal result. This study aimed to examine the effect of the village on the health preventive behavior for dengue hemorrhagic fever in Pati, Central Java.Subjects and Method: This was a case-control study conducted in Pati, Central Java, in November 2018. A sample of 225 household heads was selected by simple random sampling. The dependent variable was DHF preventive behavior. The independent variables were education, access to information, knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, community health behavior, social capital, and villages. Data on DHF status was measured by medical record. The other data were collected by questionnaire. The data were analyzed by multilevel multiple logistic regression.Results: DHF preventive behavior improved with high education (b= 0.86; 95% CI= 0.04 to 1.70; p= 0.040), good knowledge (b= 0.86; 95% CI= 0.06 to 1.67; p= 0.036), strong self efficacy (b= 0.87; 95 % CI= 0.06 to 1.68; p= 0.036), good access to information (b= 1.98; 95% CI= 1.06 to 2.87; p <0.001), positive attitude (b= 1.40; 95% CI= 0.55 to 2.25; p= 0.001), good community behavior in DHF prevention (b= 0.86; 95% CI= 0.02 to 1.70; p= 0.045), and strong social capital (b= 1.07; 95% CI= 0.26 to 1.89; p= 0.010). Village had strong contextual effect on DHF prevention behavior with ICC= 20.30%.Conclusion: DHF preventive behavior improves with high education, good knowledge, strong self-efficacy, good access to information, positive attitude, good community behavior in DHF prevention, and strong social capital. The village has a strong contextual effect on DHF prevention behavior.Keywords: dengue hemorrhagic fever, preventive behavior, village, multilevel analysisCorrespondence: Nurul Fatimah. Masters Program in Public Health.Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami 36A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java, Indonesia. Email: nurul.fatimah00049@gmail.com. Mobile: +6281329501844.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health (2019), 4(3): 198-204https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2019.04.03.07

Evaluation of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Predictor Index in Surakarta, Central Java

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 3, No 2 (2018)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global public health problem. New cases of lung Tuberculosis in 2015 were 10.4 million worldwide. One of the challenging in TB control to be addressed is the development of Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB). There were an estimated 15,380 TB cases in Indonesia by 2015 with 1,860 positive TB cases and 1,566 cases successfully treated. This study aimed to determine the predictor index for MDR-TB.Subjects and Method: This was an analytic observational study with a case-control design. The study was conducted at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta, Central Java, from August to November 2017. The study subjects were selected by fixed disease sampling including 75 MDR-TB patients and 75 TB patients. The dependent variable was MDR-TB. The independent variables were medical history, co-morbidity (Diabetes Mellitus), drug side effect, drug-taking supervisor, and regularity of treatment. The data were collected by questionnaire and medical record. The data were analyzed by a multiple logistic regression.Results: MDR-TB Occurrence Index increased with drug-taking supervisor (b = 2.33; 95% CI= 3.83 to 27.91; p<0.001), drug-side effect (b = 0.73; 95% CI= 0.58 to 7.45; p=0.026), medical history (b = 2.35; 95% CI= 3.80 to 29.38; p<0.001). MDR-TB Occurrence Index decreased by absence of type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (b = -0.56; 95% CI= 0.18 to 1.78; p= 0.033), regular treatment (b = -1.73; 95% CI= 0.06 to 0.46; p<0.001).Conclusion: MDR-TB Occurrence Index is determined by the drug-taking supervisor, drug side effect, medical history, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and regular treatment.Keywords: MDR-TB Occurrence Index, medical history, drug-taking supervisor, drug side effect, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, regular treatmentCorrespondence: Putri Pamungkas. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret. Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, 57126, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: pamungkasputri95@gmail.com.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health (2018), 3(2): 263-276https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2018.03.02.06 

Multilevel Analysis: Factors Associated with Overweight and Obesity in Primary School Children in Surakarta, Central Java

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Life course studies have shown that early onset obesity is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality later in life. In both sexes, rates of diabetes, coronary heart disease, atherosclerosis, hip fracture, and gout were increased in those who were overweight as adolescents. Contextual factor at higher level such as school may have indirect effect on the incidence of overweight or obesity through eating behavior. However, studies into factors affecting child obesity in Indonesia using multilevel approach are lacking. This study aimed to examine factors associated with overweight and obesity in primary school children in Surakarta, Central Java, using multilevel analysis.Subjects and Method: A case control study was conducted at 25 primary schools in Surakarta, Central Java, from March to April 2018. A sample of 225 primary school children was selected by fixed disease sampling, consisting of 75 children with overweight or obesity and 150 children with normal weight. The variables of children were placed at the first level of the multilevel model. The potential contextual effect of school was determined at the second level. The dependent variable was overweight or obesity. The independent variables were maternal education, maternal body mass index (BMI), physical activity, family income, and school environment. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by a multilevel logistic regression run on Stata 13.Results: Child overweight or obesity was positively associated with maternal BMI ≥25 (b= 0.11; 95% CI= 0.04 to 0.18; p= 0.002) and high family income (b= 0.04; 95% CI= 0.02 to 0.06; p< 0.001). Child overweight or obesity was negatively associated with high physical activity (b= -0.03; 95% CI= -0.05 to -0.01; p= 0.009). School environment had a negligible contextual effect on child obesity with ICC= 5.08%.Conclusion: Child obesity is positively associated with maternal BMI ≥25 and family income, and is negatively associated with physical activity. School environment has a negligible contextual effect on child obesity.Keywords: obesity, primary school children, maternal body mass index, physical activityCorrespondence: Arum Kusuma Rini. Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta 57126, Central Java. Email: arumkusumarini@yahoo.com. Mobile: +6282133044191.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health (2019), 4(1): 1-8https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2019.04.01.01

Risk Factors of Dengue Fever: Application of PRECEDE – PROCEED Model

Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health Vol 4, No 1 (2019)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Dengue infection is one of the main health problems in more than 100 tropical and subtropical countries. This study aims to analyze the factors that play a role in the occurrence of dengue fever cases by applying the PRECED - PROCEED model.Subjects and Method:This was an analytic observational study with a case control design. The study was conducted at 8 sub-districts in Sukoharjo, Central Java, from May to July 2018. A sample of 200 study subjects was selected for this study by fixed disease sampling, comprising 50 peoples with dengue fever and 150 peoples without dengue fever. The dependent variables were dengue fever. The independent variables were intention, attitude, education, dengue fever prevention, family income, and sanitation. The data were collected by questionnaire and analyzed by path analysis run on Stata 13.Results: The risk of dengue fever was directly reduced by good environmental sanitation (b= -1.32, 95% CI= -2.09 to -0.54, p= 0.001) and good prevention behavior (b= -2.61, 95% CI= -3.55 to -1.67, p<0.001). The risk of dengue fever was indirectly affected by intention, attitude, education, and family income.Conclusion: The risk of dengue fever is directly reduced by good environmental sanitation and good prevention behavior. The risk of dengue fever is indirectly affected by intention, attitude, education, and family income.Keywords: dengue fever, preventive behavior, environmental sanitation, PRECEDE-PROCEED modelCorrespondence: Kanthi Devi Ayuningtyas. School of Health Sciences Patria Husada, Blitar. Jl. Sudanco Supriyadi No 168, Blitar, East Java. Email: kanthideviayuningtyas@gmail.com. Mobile: 08125266956.Journal of Epidemiology and Public Health (2019), 4(1): 37-46https://doi.org/10.26911/jepublichealth.2019.04.01.05

Keadilan sosial dalam kebijakan kesehatan

Jurnal Kedokteran Yarsi Vol 10, No 1 (2002): Jurnal Kedokteran Yarsi
Publisher : Jurnal Kedokteran Yarsi

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Abstract

ABSTRACTHealth economics has concern on how tofind the most efficient allocation of health resources to achieve a preset policy goal. Equity, or fairness, is another important criterion that should be put into consideration by health economists and policy makers. A just distribution of health semice and the needs to meet health service to the community are depended on ethicaltheoy. And this kind of theory that elaborates in setting a just distribution of economic resources is called theory of social justice. This paper explores several examples of theories of social justice derived from philosophy of normative economy. The goal has no relation on how to find a consensus-accepted theory but to deliberate equity issues that must be keptin mind when setting a policy on allocation of health resources.KEYWORDS equity; distribution of resources; normative economics; theoy of social justice.

Factors Influencing the Difference between Indonesian Case-Based Group Reimbursement and Medical Cost for Patients with Chronic Renal Disease Cases in Kasih Ibu Hospital, Surakarta

Journal of Health Policy and Management Vol 2, No 2 (2017)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Backgorund: JKN program has stipulated the INA CBGs reimbursement for the payment of treatment in referral health facilities, including for chronic renal disease which is a disease burden. This study aimed to analyze factors influencing the difference between Indonesian case-based group reimbursement and medical cost for patients with chronic renal disease cases in Kasih Ibu Hospital, Surakarta.Subjects and Method: The study design was an analytic observational with cross sectional design. The study was conducted in Kasih Ibu Hospital Surakarta in August-October, 2017. With a total of 231 subjects sample which was selected by using proportional random sampling. The dependent variable was the difference between Indonesian case-based group reimbursement and medical cost. The independent variables were length of stay, type of class, medical treatment/ surgery, ICU treatment, and medication use. The data were analyzed using multiple linear regression.Result: INA CBGs reimbursement (mean= Rp 6,120,000; SD= Rp 2,330,000) paid by BPJS Kesehatan was lower than actual hospital’s medical care cost (mean= Rp 7,070,000; SD= Rp 4,650,000). Factors profitable for hospitals were medical treatments/ surgery (b= 0.032; p= 0.552). Factors that inflicted financial loss were class 1 care (b= -0.104; p= 0.094), class 2 care (b= -0.033; p= 0.590) compared to class 3 care, length of stay (b= -0.541; p<0.001), medication use in accordance with national formulation (b= -0.183; p= 0.008) and the use of ICU (b= -0.045; p= 0.543). Patients who upgraded the class type (mean= Rp 5,526,074; SD= Rp 1,449,621) was higher than hospital’s medical cost for class 2 (mean= Rp 3,933,767; SD= Rp 1,887,900).Conclusion: Mean of INA CBGs reimbursement on inpatient care of chronic renal disease is lower than the mean of hospital’s medical care cost. Length of stay and doctors’ compliance in using national medication formulation are important determinants to increase medical care cost. Hospital obtains profit from patients who upgrade type of class.Key words: care cost, INA CBGs reimbursement, chronic renal diseaseCorrespondence: Mardhatillah. Kasih Ibu Hospital, Surakarta, Central Java. Email: mardhatillah.bws@gmail.com. Mobile: 089510610891.Journal of Health Policy and Management (2017), 2(2): 117-127https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpm.2017.02.02.03

The Representation of Social, Economic, Psychological, and Reproductive Health Condition of the Commercial Sex Workers Post-closing of the Dolly Complex in Surabaya

Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior Vol 2, No 1 (2017)
Publisher : Masters Program in Public Health, Universitas Sebelas Maret, Indonesia

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Abstract

Background: Dolly was the biggest red light district in Southeast Asia with more than 1000 (a thousand) women working as commercial sex workers. Because the district imposed a very negative effect  to the surrounding inhabitants especially to children, therefore red light district area of  Dolly and Jarak which are located in  residential area had to be closed. The quality of life of the residents especially the commercial sex workers was very much affected after the district was closed.  The study aimed to understand the representation of the social, economic, psychological, and reproductive health condition after the Dolly district in Surabaya was closed.Subject and Method: This was a qualitative descriptive study with phenomenology approach. This study was  conducted in former red light districts of Dolly and Jarak in Surabaya from January 18-February 28, 2017. The informant of this study were commercial sex workers, former commercial sex workers, head of hamlet (RW), former pander of Dolly,  Head of Civil Society Organization, healthcare workers, and Social Office of Surabaya City. The sampling technique used was snowball sampling, with in-depth interviews, observation, documentation study. The data were analyzed by interactive analysis model including data collection, data reduction, display and verification. Results: The commercial sex workers characteristic prior and post closing of the district were around 28-43 years old, with elementary – senior high school educated. Most of the commercial sex workers were from outside the city with 1-5 customers/day. They charged Rp. 100-300 thousand (Dolly’s commercial sex workers) per customer and Rp. 100-200 thousand/customer (Jarak’s commercial sex workers). The representation of quality of life post-closing was poor, altered social condition,  lack of interaction with others, the degradation of economic condition, poor psychological condition due to the economical problem, and reproductive health was less protected  because they did not get  regular examination like before the complex was closed.Conclusion: The representation  of quality of life in terms of the condition of social, economic, psychology, and reproductive health of the commercial sex workers post Dolly and Jarak closing were poor. Therefore, government intervention was very much needed to help improving the quality of life of the commercial sex workers.Keywords: Commercial sex workers, social, economic, psychological, reproductive health.Correspondence: Danty Indra Puspitaningtyas. Masters Program of Public Health, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta. Email: dantyindra@yahoo.com. Mobile:  +6285732850663Journal of Health Promotion and Behavior (2017), 2(1): 77-87https://doi.org/10.26911/thejhpb.2017.02.01.07

Co-Authors - Mutalazimah -, Handoko -, Isfaizah -, Joeliatin -, Kadarwati -, Lusiatun -, Mardhatillah -, Masturoh -, Muryanti -, Vera . Muthmainah Achmad Arman Subijanto, Achmad Arman Aderita, Novi Indah Afiono Agung Prasetyo Agatha Widiyawati, Agatha Agung Kurniawan Agus Soedomo Agustin, Dyah Ayu Agustina, Devita Ahmad Yasa, Ahmad Akbar, Prima Soultoni Alfiyani, Lina Alifia, Latifah Nur Ambar Mudigdo Amir, Nikmah Ayu Ramadhani Andreas Agung Kurniawan, Andreas Agung Andri Iryawan Anggraeni, Fatimah Dewi Annisa Marsha Evanti Ardelia Kurniawan Ardianti, Febrina Argyo Demartoto, Argyo Ari Natalia Probandari Ari Probandari Ariesta Permatasari Arif Siswanto Arifin, Ayu Kusuma Puspasari Arisona, Widya Lusi Ariza Putri Uniq Pratiwi, Ariza Putri Uniq Arum Wijayanti Aryoseto, Lukman Atmodjo, Joko Tri Ayuningtyas, Kanthi Devi Bobbi Juni Saputra Budi Mulyono Budi Yulianto Budihastuti, Uki Retno Caesaria Christ Haryadi Cahyaningrum, Lusia Arina Darmayanti, Aquartuti Tri Darto Della Kusumaning Putri Delpia, Yesi Vila Dermatoto, Argyo Desi Ekawati Deviasti, Rindra Dewi Indriani Dewi Susilowati Dewi, Lanti Retno Diana, Tutut Okta Didik Tamtomo, Didik Diffah Hanim Dono Indarto Drajat Tri Kartono dwi ayu lestari, dwi ayu Dwi Setyawan Dwihestie, Luluk Khusnul Edi Karyadi, Edi Ekasari, Dily Elsa Adila Ramadhian Endang Listyaningsih Endang Sri Wahyuni Endang Sutisna Sulaeman Endang Sutrisna Endang Tri Sulistyowati, Endang Tri Erayanti Saloko Ermawati, Dwi Hesti Eskawati, Maria Yeny Eti Poncorini Pamungkasari Fahmi Hakam Fajriyah, Yuli Lutfatul Fauziyah, Rahma Febriani, Gabriela Advitri Fikriyyah, Syarifatul Firza Fatchya Gloria Katrin Evasari Gusti, Titis Eka Hadi Sudjito Halu, Silfia Angela N Harsono Salimo Hartanto, O S Hartono Hartono Harumi, Linda Haryanti, Rusiana Sri Hastuti, Uki Retno Budi Hendra Dwi Kurniawan, Hendra Dwi Hermanu Joebagio Hermanu Joebagyo Hervindita Dinda Siswandwika, Hervindita Dinda Hidayati, Alvy Nur Ida Mardalena Ida Srisurani Wiji Astuti, Ida Srisurani Ida Srisurani Wiji Astuti, Ida Srisurani Wiji Inayati, Rizqi Indria, Gita Ayu Irawanto, Muhammad Eko Jannah, Ahadyah Miftahul Jumadi - K, Isyana Miranti Kartika, Dian Surya Keswara, Nila Widya Kogoya, Tena Kurniasari, Mia Ashari kusnandar kusnandar Kusumaningrum, Remita Yuli Kusumaningtyas, Mei Larasati, Gayatri Kintan Latifah, Mirzawati Lely Erawati Listiani, Funik Rahma Mei Lolita Lolita Luthfiyana, Nurul Ulya Mahendra Wijaya Mangunsong, Roy Romey Daulas Maria Dewi Caetline Maria Goretti Novianty Hutauruk Marlinawati, Iin Tri Martha Oktavia Dewi Savitri Marthunus Judin Maryati, Warsi Miden, Destinady Kadiser Miftahul Arozaq, Miftahul Mirshanti, Farahdila Moch Fanani MS, Novi Paramitasari Muchsin Doewes Muhammad Akhyar Muhammad Fanani Muhammad Masykuri Muhammad Syaifuddin Mulyo Hadi Sudjito Mutalazimah - Mutalazimah Mutalazimah MUTHMAINAH . Nahak, Maria Paula Marla Namangboling, Agung Dirgantara Nanda, Febrika Devi Nasir, Shinta Nindiyastuti, Nadia Ayu Irma Ningrum, Dhian Nurayni Sulistyo Ningtyas, Anindiya Nisa, Shofia Maharani Khoirun Niswah, Sayida Royatun Noor Alis Setiyadi Nudhira, Uyunun Nunuk Suryani Nur, Syukma Rhamadani Faizal Nuralita, Ayunda Yonik Nurhayati Agtikasari, Nurhayati Nurindahsari, Yespy Anna Wahyu nurlailis saadah, nurlailis Nursani, Anggia Rahmah Nurul Fatimah Octava Prima Arta Oemar Sri Hartanto Oemar Sri Hartanto Oepomo, Tedjo Danudjo Osi Pamungkas, Putri Pandayu, Ardiansyah Panduwinata, Annisa Widya Pawito -, Pawito Pawito . Pawito Pawito Permana, Fransisca Novalia Pertiwi, Galuh Tunjung Pipiet Wulandari Poncorini, Eti Pramiyana, Ira Martin Pranita, Liliana Dwi Pranoto, Hosea Puspitasari Prasetya, Hanung Prasetyowati, Ummy Prastiwi Putri Basuki, Prastiwi Putri Pratita Komalasari Pratiwi, Dinda Ika Prawita, Mirna Primadita, Hanggia Pritania Prameswara Putri Puji Astuti Anggara Purbanova, Reni Puri, Yessica Eka Purwaningsih, Yustina Purwaningtyas, Niniek Puspa Damayanti Puspitaningtyas, Danty Indra Puspitasari, Lina Putri, Risma Aliviani Putriarsih, Ryanawati Qadrijati, Isna Rahardjo, Setyo Rahardjo, Setyo Sri Rahayuningsih, Tutik Rahmawati, Dechoni Rahmawati, Isabella Rakhmahayu, Atika Ramadani, Aulia Noorvita Ratna Puspitasari, Ratna Ratnaningsih, Titin Ravik Karsidi RB. Soemanto Respatih, Supriyadi Hari Retiyansa, Yesi Reviono Rifai Hartanto Rini, Arum Kusuma Riska Rosita Risna Widowati Rita Benya Adriani Roobiati, Nur Fika Rosalina Pradana Ayu Rosalina, Sintya RUBEN DHARMAWAN Rusmitasari, Heni Rustam Sunaryo Sabania, Brillian Ferika Saifuddin Azwar Sajalia, Husniyati Sandhi Yudha Santosa, Sugeng Budi Sapja Anantanyu, Sapja Saptowati, Dewi Sayidah, Diana Setyadi, Ahmad Wasis Setyaningrum, Th. Catur Wulan Shofri, M Maulana Siti Nurhalimah Soemanto, RB Soemanto, RB Soetrisno . Sofiyani, Maya Sri Hartini Sri Nuryati Sri Panuntun, Sri Subaeti, Tri Sugeng Budi Santoso Sumanto - Sumardiyono . Sunarsih, Tri Sundari, Ana Suprapto, Bambang Susanti, Rahmah Purwaningsih Febri Susilawati, Tri Nugraha Susilowati, Bekti Sutanto . Syahmi Amar Tamtoto, Didik Timoer, Seindy Arya Kusuma Tiyas, Dwi Wahyuning Tri Budi Wiryanto Trisnawati, Iga Tungga, Tersia Marentiva Umami, Afriza Umi Nadhiroh Utomo, Gunawan Cahyo Viridula, Erike Yunicha Vivin Eka Rahmawati, Vivin Eka Wachdin, Fetty Rosyadia Wahyuni, Dewi Nofa Wahyuningsih, Christiana Sri Waryana Waryana Wasyanto, Trisulo Wasyanto, Trisulo Wekadigunawan, Cri SP Wekadigunawan, CSP Wekadigunawan, CSP. Whendi Setyawan Widarto Widarto Widiyanto, Aris Wijayanti, Nurlatifah Febriana Wijiwinarsih, Amallia Windiarti Dwi Purnaningrum Winiarti, Dian Yeimo, Yulianda yulia lanti retno dewi Yulia Lanti Retno Dewi Yuliana, Ana Yuliana, Ana Yuliani, Istri Yunita, Astri Yusriyani Yusup Subagio Yusup Subagio Sutanto Zicof, Erick