S.N Jarmani
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Performance of native chicken given free choice feed Kompiang, I.P; ., Supriyati; Togatorop, M.H; Jarmani, S.N
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 2 (2001)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.376 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.224

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of free choice feeding on the performance of native chicken and to determine its protein and energy requirements for growth. Eight hundreds and seventy 2-weeks old native chicken were used, and divided into three treatment groups, with 5 replicates: (I) Complete feed (II) Choice feed A (two levels of protein, similar in energy content) and (III) Choice feed B (energy and protein sources). Feed and water were given ad libitum during the 10 weeks trial. Feed intake (protein and energy) and body weight were recorded biweekly. Body weight gain (BWG) of treatment I was 852 + 33 grams/head, similar to treatment II, 858 + 28 grams/head, and both significantly (P<0.05) better than treatment III (800 + 42 grams/head). Energy consumption and its energy efficiency ratio (EER) value were similar for all treatments, 9226 + 149; 9203 + 739, and 8706 + 383 kcal/head and 10.84 + 0.34, 10.75 + 1.03, and 10.89 + 0.27 kcal/gram for treatment I, II and III, respectively. There was a significant (P<0.05) difference between treatment on protein intake, 556 + 8, 506 + 15, and 454 + 25 grams/head for treatment I, II, and III, respectively. Protein energy ratio (PER) value of treatment III (0.57 ± 0.02) was similar to treatment II (0.57 ± 0.02) and both were significantly better (P<0.05) than treatment I (0.65 ± 0.02). It was concluded that the native chicken, given a correct choice of feed, has an ability to determine its energy and protein requirements. During the growth periods, 2-12 weeks old, the bird require feed with 16% protein and 2900 kcal metabolized energy/kg.   Key word: Native chicken, feeding system, free choice
Response of sheep to supplementation of Probio-catalytic in the diets Haryanto, B; ., Supriyati; Jarmani, S.N
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 13, No 4 (2008)
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (72.861 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i4.569

Abstract

biotic and catalytic supplement, on the productive performances of sheep fed Pennisetum purpuphoides (King grass). The concentrate was made of rice bran, molasses-coated palm kernel cake, minerals and salt. Probio-catalytic supplements were added either at 0.5% or 1.0% of the concentrate. The probiotic in the probio-catalytic supplements was either Probion (produced by Balitnak) and assigned as probio-catalytic supplement A, or a mixture of rumen microbes of buffaloes which was assigned as probio-catalytic B. The catalytic supplement consisted of gelatinized sago, Zn, Co, urea and sulfur. Twenty heads of male young sheep with an average liveweight of 18.8 ± 1.7 kg were divided into 4 groups based on the bodyweight and allocated to 5 feeding treatments. The treatments were (1) Control (without probio-catalytic supplement), (2) R1 addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 0.5%, (3) R2 addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 1.0%, (4) R3 addition of probio-catalytic supplement B at 0.5%, and (5) R4 addition of probio-catalytic supplement B at 1.0%. The experiment was carried out by a randomized block design. A four-week adaptation period was then followed by a 12-week feed intake data collection and growth trial. An intake and digestibility study of the feed was carried out for 7 days. Rumen fluids were taken for analysis of pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acids and microbial population. Results indicated a significantly greater weight gain in the group received R1 than that of the other treatments. Feed dry matter intakes were less in the groups supplemented with probio-catalytic resulting in a better feed conversion ratio. The pH and concentration of ammonia of rumen fluid were not significantly different among treatments. While the acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations were not different among treatments, the butyric acid was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the groups received R3 and R4, whereas those received R2 and R3 was not significantly different than that of the control group. The molar proportion of volatile fatty acid components was within the normal values. Based on the results of the present experiment, it was concluded that addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 0.5% was advantageous and it could be suggested to be included in the diet to improve the productive performance of sheep.     Key Words: Probio-Catalytic Supplement, Productive Performance, Sheep
Response of sheep to supplementation of Probio-catalytic in the diets Haryanto, B; ., Supriyati; Jarmani, S.N
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 13, No 4 (2008): DECEMBER 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (72.861 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i4.569

Abstract

biotic and catalytic supplement, on the productive performances of sheep fed Pennisetum purpuphoides (King grass). The concentrate was made of rice bran, molasses-coated palm kernel cake, minerals and salt. Probio-catalytic supplements were added either at 0.5% or 1.0% of the concentrate. The probiotic in the probio-catalytic supplements was either Probion (produced by Balitnak) and assigned as probio-catalytic supplement A, or a mixture of rumen microbes of buffaloes which was assigned as probio-catalytic B. The catalytic supplement consisted of gelatinized sago, Zn, Co, urea and sulfur. Twenty heads of male young sheep with an average liveweight of 18.8 ± 1.7 kg were divided into 4 groups based on the bodyweight and allocated to 5 feeding treatments. The treatments were (1) Control (without probio-catalytic supplement), (2) R1 addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 0.5%, (3) R2 addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 1.0%, (4) R3 addition of probio-catalytic supplement B at 0.5%, and (5) R4 addition of probio-catalytic supplement B at 1.0%. The experiment was carried out by a randomized block design. A four-week adaptation period was then followed by a 12-week feed intake data collection and growth trial. An intake and digestibility study of the feed was carried out for 7 days. Rumen fluids were taken for analysis of pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acids and microbial population. Results indicated a significantly greater weight gain in the group received R1 than that of the other treatments. Feed dry matter intakes were less in the groups supplemented with probio-catalytic resulting in a better feed conversion ratio. The pH and concentration of ammonia of rumen fluid were not significantly different among treatments. While the acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations were not different among treatments, the butyric acid was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the groups received R3 and R4, whereas those received R2 and R3 was not significantly different than that of the control group. The molar proportion of volatile fatty acid components was within the normal values. Based on the results of the present experiment, it was concluded that addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 0.5% was advantageous and it could be suggested to be included in the diet to improve the productive performance of sheep.     Key Words: Probio-Catalytic Supplement, Productive Performance, Sheep
Performance of native chicken given free choice feed Kompiang, I.P; ., Supriyati; Togatorop, M.H; Jarmani, S.N
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.376 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.224

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of free choice feeding on the performance of native chicken and to determine its protein and energy requirements for growth. Eight hundreds and seventy 2-weeks old native chicken were used, and divided into three treatment groups, with 5 replicates: (I) Complete feed (II) Choice feed A (two levels of protein, similar in energy content) and (III) Choice feed B (energy and protein sources). Feed and water were given ad libitum during the 10 weeks trial. Feed intake (protein and energy) and body weight were recorded biweekly. Body weight gain (BWG) of treatment I was 852 + 33 grams/head, similar to treatment II, 858 + 28 grams/head, and both significantly (P<0.05) better than treatment III (800 + 42 grams/head). Energy consumption and its energy efficiency ratio (EER) value were similar for all treatments, 9226 + 149; 9203 + 739, and 8706 + 383 kcal/head and 10.84 + 0.34, 10.75 + 1.03, and 10.89 + 0.27 kcal/gram for treatment I, II and III, respectively. There was a significant (P<0.05) difference between treatment on protein intake, 556 + 8, 506 + 15, and 454 + 25 grams/head for treatment I, II, and III, respectively. Protein energy ratio (PER) value of treatment III (0.57 ± 0.02) was similar to treatment II (0.57 ± 0.02) and both were significantly better (P<0.05) than treatment I (0.65 ± 0.02). It was concluded that the native chicken, given a correct choice of feed, has an ability to determine its energy and protein requirements. During the growth periods, 2-12 weeks old, the bird require feed with 16% protein and 2900 kcal metabolized energy/kg.   Key word: Native chicken, feeding system, free choice
Response of sheep to supplementation of Probio-catalytic in the diets Haryanto, B; ., Supriyati; Jarmani, S.N
Jurnal Ilmu Ternak dan Veteriner Vol 13, No 4 (2008): DECEMBER 2008
Publisher : Indonesian Animal Sciences Society

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (72.861 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v13i4.569

Abstract

biotic and catalytic supplement, on the productive performances of sheep fed Pennisetum purpuphoides (King grass). The concentrate was made of rice bran, molasses-coated palm kernel cake, minerals and salt. Probio-catalytic supplements were added either at 0.5% or 1.0% of the concentrate. The probiotic in the probio-catalytic supplements was either Probion (produced by Balitnak) and assigned as probio-catalytic supplement A, or a mixture of rumen microbes of buffaloes which was assigned as probio-catalytic B. The catalytic supplement consisted of gelatinized sago, Zn, Co, urea and sulfur. Twenty heads of male young sheep with an average liveweight of 18.8 ± 1.7 kg were divided into 4 groups based on the bodyweight and allocated to 5 feeding treatments. The treatments were (1) Control (without probio-catalytic supplement), (2) R1 addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 0.5%, (3) R2 addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 1.0%, (4) R3 addition of probio-catalytic supplement B at 0.5%, and (5) R4 addition of probio-catalytic supplement B at 1.0%. The experiment was carried out by a randomized block design. A four-week adaptation period was then followed by a 12-week feed intake data collection and growth trial. An intake and digestibility study of the feed was carried out for 7 days. Rumen fluids were taken for analysis of pH, ammonia and volatile fatty acids and microbial population. Results indicated a significantly greater weight gain in the group received R1 than that of the other treatments. Feed dry matter intakes were less in the groups supplemented with probio-catalytic resulting in a better feed conversion ratio. The pH and concentration of ammonia of rumen fluid were not significantly different among treatments. While the acetic acid and propionic acid concentrations were not different among treatments, the butyric acid was significantly lower (P<0.05) in the groups received R3 and R4, whereas those received R2 and R3 was not significantly different than that of the control group. The molar proportion of volatile fatty acid components was within the normal values. Based on the results of the present experiment, it was concluded that addition of probio-catalytic supplement A at 0.5% was advantageous and it could be suggested to be included in the diet to improve the productive performance of sheep.     Key Words: Probio-Catalytic Supplement, Productive Performance, Sheep
Performance of native chicken given free choice feed Kompiang, I.P; ., Supriyati; Togatorop, M.H; Jarmani, S.N
Indonesian Journal of Animal and Veterinary Sciences Vol 6, No 2 (2001): JUNE 2001
Publisher : Indonesian Center for Animal Research and Development (ICARD)

Show Abstract | Download Original | Original Source | Check in Google Scholar | Full PDF (131.376 KB) | DOI: 10.14334/jitv.v6i2.224

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to study the effect of free choice feeding on the performance of native chicken and to determine its protein and energy requirements for growth. Eight hundreds and seventy 2-weeks old native chicken were used, and divided into three treatment groups, with 5 replicates: (I) Complete feed (II) Choice feed A (two levels of protein, similar in energy content) and (III) Choice feed B (energy and protein sources). Feed and water were given ad libitum during the 10 weeks trial. Feed intake (protein and energy) and body weight were recorded biweekly. Body weight gain (BWG) of treatment I was 852 + 33 grams/head, similar to treatment II, 858 + 28 grams/head, and both significantly (P&lt;0.05) better than treatment III (800 + 42 grams/head). Energy consumption and its energy efficiency ratio (EER) value were similar for all treatments, 9226 + 149; 9203 + 739, and 8706 + 383 kcal/head and 10.84 + 0.34, 10.75 + 1.03, and 10.89 + 0.27 kcal/gram for treatment I, II and III, respectively. There was a significant (P&lt;0.05) difference between treatment on protein intake, 556 + 8, 506 + 15, and 454 + 25 grams/head for treatment I, II, and III, respectively. Protein energy ratio (PER) value of treatment III (0.57 ± 0.02) was similar to treatment II (0.57 ± 0.02) and both were significantly better (P&lt;0.05) than treatment I (0.65 ± 0.02). It was concluded that the native chicken, given a correct choice of feed, has an ability to determine its energy and protein requirements. During the growth periods, 2-12 weeks old, the bird require feed with 16% protein and 2900 kcal metabolized energy/kg.   Key word: Native chicken, feeding system, free choice