Sri Wuli Fitriati
English Department Universitas Negeri Semarang Indonesia

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PENDEKATAN E-LEARNING DENGAN FASILITAS BLOG SEBAGAI MEDIA DALAM MATA KULIAH READING DAN WRITING Utami, Triyoga Dharma; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
Lingua Vol 7, No 1 (2011): January 2011
Publisher : Lingua

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Abstract

This study is a basic one. The objectives are to describe the readiness of planning and implementing theinternet-based program in English Department, to appraise student motivation and need in using the internetbasedlearning media that support their reading and writing skills in and outside the classroom, and to assessthe implementation, use and development of blog media in their reading and writing classes for one semester.The study involves the students from the reading and writing classes during the data collection by havingquestionnaires, discussion and observation to each class blog. The descriptive-qualitative approach is used withregards to quantitative outputs from the questionnaires. The study shows that the availability of internet facility inEnglish Department still needs improvement along with the extended requirements for the internet-basedlearning process, student skill in information technology and their motivation to access more quality information.Proper planning should be arranged in the learning process that uses blogs as the media, by emphasizingvalues, characters, novelty of the ideas revealed in the student writing works.Kata kunci: e-learning, media blog, jaringan internet, proses pembelajaran
The The Use of Appraising Items in Doyle’s Novel Titled A Study in Scarlet Rahimi, Ranti Harvi; Fitriati, Sri Wuli; Sutopo, Djoko
English Education Journal Vol 9 No 2 (2019): June 2019
Publisher : English Education Journal

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This research investigated the interpersonal meaning in A Study in Scarlet, how the appraising items used by the main characters and also its pedagogical implication to English education by using the framework by Halliday (2004) and Kress van Leeuwen (2006). The objectives of this research were to explain the use of the attitude, consisting of affect, judgment, and appreciation. This research was a discourse analysis which belongs to qualitative research. The source was nine chapters from the novel which is divided into two parts. The object was the utterances from the main characters. The units of the research were the clauses consisted in the chapters. The finding showed that the use of the attitude was dominated by Dr. Watson as the main character and also the narrator. In affect, he used mostly happiness, negative capacity, normality in judgment and positive reaction in appreciation. It can be concluded that the writer portrayed Sherlock Holmes through Dr. Watson’s utterances and monologues in order to show Holmes characters, how he reacted to series of events in the novel by using certain appraising items. By applying appraising items in teaching-learning, this research hopefully could help students to enhance their interpersonal skills in communication inside or outside the classroom to reach the purpose of having varied and natural conversation also a mutual understanding.
SAFETALK PRACTICES IN CONTENT AND LANGUAGE INTEGRATED LEARNING (CLIL) CLASSES Fitriati, Sri Wuli
Language Circle: Journal of Language and Literature Vol 11, No 1 (2016): October 2016
Publisher : Language Circle: Journal of Language and Literature

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Abstract

This article is drawn from a larger ethnographic case study of a state senior high school in a city in the province of Central Java, Indonesia. The study was classroom discourse analysis, focusing on identifying and examining classroom interactional and pedagogical practices in Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL) lessons. CLIL is a type of bilingual education in which some content areas (such as Sciences) are learned through a foreign language. The research participants in this study were Indonesian teachers of Mathematics, Biology, and Geography who were encouraged to teach their subjects in English language because of the political ideology and educational policy at the time the data collected. The data emerged from classroom observations notes, lesson transcripts, and post-lesson interviews with video-stimulated recall. The interpretation and analysis of the data involved cross-checking different sources of evidence. Braun and Clarke’s thematic analysis (2006) was employed in the analysis of the data. The finding reveals that there was a salient pattern in the interactional and pedagogical practices of the subject teachers which can be called safetalk. The finding also shows that safetalk hinder the students’ second language acquisition and development. This article offers deeper insights on the interaction and pedagogy in CLIL classes, which can promote critical reflection and contribute to future English bilingual teacher education, particularly in the Indonesian educational contexts.
PSYCHOLOGICAL PROBLEMS FACED BY THE YEAR – ELEVEN STUDENTS OF MA NUHAD DEMAK IN SPEAKING ENGLISH Jannah, Mar’atul; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
English Education Journal Vol 6 No 1 (2016)
Publisher : English Education Journal

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Abstract

Speaking English for most Indonesian students is very challenging in terms of bravery to speak the language. Most of them show anxieties when they use it to communicate with others. The aim of this research was to: 1) to explain the psychological problems faced by the year - eleven students in speaking English; 2) to explain the causes of psychological problems faced by the year - eleven students in speaking English; and 3) to explain the effects of psychological problems. A qualitative case study was used in this research. The findings were derived from classroom observation, field notes, questionnaires, and interviews. The findings revealed three results. First, the psychological problems faced by the year-eleven students in MA NurulIttihadDemak in speaking English were: 1) most of the students were afraid of making mistakes because they were afraid if they cannot convey the message clearly and being ridiculed by their friends; 2) most of them were shy because they felt that they did not have good pronunciation and they were also ashamed if their friends laugh off their wrong pronunciation; 3) most of them were anxious because when they spoke English, all of their friends’ eyes looked at them and gave full attention to them, including their teacher. Consequently, although they had had an idea to be expressed in English, suddenly they lost their idea and they cannot say anything in front of their friends. Most of the students lacked of confidence because they felt that their English was bad and they realized that their interlocutors do not understand them or they do not understand other speakers. They lacked of motivation because they did not like English; English was boring for them; and speaking English was difficult for them. The last, psychological problems had significant effects. They inhibited the students in speaking English. They also made the speaking activity to be passive and the speaking teaching and learning process could not run well. Therefore, teachers must give a great attention to the fact that psychological problems exist in students and students must be aware of the importance of speaking skill.
THE SOCIO-CULTURAL CONSTRAINTS IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF POLITENESS STRATEGIES IN THE INTERACTIONS AMONG ENGLISH LANGUAGE EDUCATION STUDENTS Suwartama, I Made; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
English Education Journal Vol 7 No 1 (2017)
Publisher : English Education Journal

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This study aimed to investigated socio- cultural constraints in the implementation of politeness strategies in the interaction among English Graduate Students. This study used discourse analytic approach by involving 30 participants. Source of the data:  students’utterances. Methods of collecting data: recording, transcribing and questionnaire. Techniques of analysing data: identifying, categorizing, interpreting, and tabulating. To achieve the trustworthiness  used triangulation. The findingsshowed 16 aspects of social constraints: 3 social status (18.75%), 2 social environment (12.5%), 2 family status (12.5%), 2 economy/financial (12.5%), 1 social determinant of health (6.25%), 1 adverse childhood experience (6.25%), 3 social relationship (18.75%), 2 kinship system (12.5%).There were18 cultural aspect constraints: 2 perceptions (11.11%), 2 motivations (11.11%), 3 experiences (16.67%) , 2 emotional (11.11%), 3 cultures (16.67%), 2 physical (11.11%), 2 linguistics (11.11%), and 2 nonverbal (11.11%). The total number of positive politeness were 65 aspects of positive politeness and 39 kinds of negative   politeness. The cultural aspect constraints appeared more frequently than social aspect constraints. Positive politeness strategies appeared more frequently than negative politeness strategies. It can be concluded that the participantsmostly used politeness strategies to redress the addressee’s positive face.
LEARNING STRATEGIES USED BY LEARNERS WITH DIFFERENT SPEAKING PERFORMANCE FOR DEVELOPING SPEAKING ABILITY Karomi Safari, M. Ubaidillah; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
English Education Journal Vol 6 No 2 (2016)
Publisher : English Education Journal

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This study describes learning strategies used by English language learners with different speaking performance. The aims of this study were (1) describing learning strategies used by learners with high and low speaking performance in improving their speaking abilities, (2) describingthe difference of learning strategies used by learners with high and low speaking performance, (3) Describing factors are influencing the use of learning strategies by learners, (4) Describing problems encountered by learners with low speaking.This study was a qualitative case study on 20 learners of speaking classes. Those learners were taken from two classes at two English courses. The data were collected by using classroom observations, questionnaires, interviews, and the data of learners’ achievement given by teachers. Those were analyzed in descriptive qualitative method.The finding reveals five results: (1) Learners wih high speaking performance used all kinds of strategies in learning speaking. They employed those stretegies in the aqual degree of frequency. (2) Learners with low speaking performance usually used cognitive, metacogntitive and social strategies. They also did not apply those strategies in aqual degree of frequency. (3) Learners with high speaking performance used strategies more dominantly and actively than those with low speaking performers. (4) Learners with high speaking performance seemed to have higher motivation than low speaking performance. This case influences the application of those strategies. (5) Problems encountered by learners with low speaking performance were in the application of strategies. The lowest percentages of variance were explained by memory, compensatory, and affective strategies.
THE EFFECTIVENESS OF MIND MAPPING-SILENT CARD SHUFFLE Rahmawati, Puspa Merah; ., Indrawati; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
ELT Forum: Journal of English Language Teaching Vol 6 No 2 (2017): ELT Forum: Journal of English Language Teaching
Publisher : ELT Forum: Journal of English Language Teaching

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This paper is based on the quasi-experimental research which aims to find out the effectiveness of mind mapping-silent card shuffle combination to improve students’ achievement in narrative writing skill. The subject of this study was the eighth grade students of a state junior high school in Semarang in the academic year of 2015/2016. The sample consisted of 64 students from two classes. The data were derived from test, interview, and documentation. The data were then measured and analyzed by the statistical and interpretation. The result showed that after the students were given treatment by using mind mapping-silent card shuffle combination,the mean scores of the experimental group increased about 28.49%. The t-test showed that tvalue (3.839) was higher than ttable (1.998). It can be concluded that the working hypothesis (Ha) which states that “There is a significant difference of effectiveness and learning achievement in writing narrative story of students who are taught by using mind mapping-silent card shuffle combination technique and those who are not taught by using that technique” is accepted. Therefore, a mind mapping-silent card shuffle combination technique is effective for students to improve their achievement in narrative writing skill.
PATTERNS OF INTERACTION IN PEER FEEDBACK PROVISION TO THE STUDENTS’ EXPOSITORY WRITINGS Mufiz, Ali; Fitriati, Sri Wuli; Sukrisno, Alim
English Education Journal Vol 7 No 1 (2017)
Publisher : English Education Journal

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This  study  investigated  students’  nature  in  pair  interaction  due  to  its  vital  role  in  learning. Therefore this study was aimed to describe and to explain patterns of interaction in peer feedback, the aspects of writing the students were concerned within peer feedback, influences of pair interactions to the students’ writings, and the students’ perceptions and attitudes on peer feedback. This study mostly employed qualitative approach and a case study method. The result showed that five patterns emerged in pair interaction i.e. collaborative pairs, dominant/dominant pair, dominant/passive  pairs,  expert/novice  pairs,  and  passive/passive  pair.  However,  feedback provided by collaborative and expert learners contributed to the revision changes of their partner’s writings so that the development of writing aspects under these two patterns was better. Besides, other  factors which  contributed to the  students’  writings  were  confounding  variables such as student’s proficiency, writing capability, and teacher feedback. Thus these results endorsed the former studies e.g. Storch’s (2002b) study, Iris’ (2014) study, and Roberson’s (2014) study. Another result  was  that  whole  students  had  good  perceptions  and  good  attitudes  on  peer  feedback provision. However, the bottom line of this study was that collaborative pairs and expert/novice pairs had better second writings.
Effectiveness Of Student Team Achievement Division Cooperative Learning And Direct Instruction In Teaching Reading Comprehension To Students With Different Learning Motivation Oktaviana, Tyas; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
English Education Journal Vol 7 No 2 (2017)
Publisher : English Education Journal

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This study aimed at investigating the effects of Student Team Achievement Division Cooperative Learning (STAD CL) and Direct Instruction (DI)  on improving students reading comprehension with high or low learning motivation at eleventh grade students of Senior High School 1 Kudus and finding solutions and strategies to make teachers have the preference to use of STAD CL and DI in delivering the subject matter while teaching. This study was experimental research named two-way (two-by-two) factorial design. The population of this study was the eleventh year students of State Islamic Senior High School 1 Kudus in the Academic Year 2015/2016. There were five classes from XI-A to XI -E. Each class had 35 students, therefore, the total population was 175 students. Meanwhile the samples of this study were eighty students from four classes selected based on the historical factors and pre-existing ability. 80 students were chosen to be a sample, 40 as STAD CL group and 40 as DI group. Both groups were given the pre-test to measure students reading skill and after several times of treatments, both groups were given the post-test. The results of this study showed that STAD CL as teaching strategy for teaching reading to those who had high and low learning motivation compared to DI was more effective than DI because most students stated that STAD CL contributed to increase the reading performance in the classroom. Further study may also be conducted to determine whether teachers’ use of STAD CL or DI appears to reduce student anxiety and stress in the classroom to improve students’ reading or even other skills, retention, and student-teacher relationships.
Children’s Production of Interlanguage in Speaking English As The Foreign Language kusumaningtyas, yulia shinta; Rukmini, Dwi; Fitriati, Sri Wuli
English Education Journal Vol 8 No 4 (2018): December 2018
Publisher : English Education Journal

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Acquiring English as a foreign language and using it as a second language (L2) in early years (children up to six years old) at immersion education happen to some process. In that process, the children tend to use L2 spontaneously and produce interlanguage as stated by Selinker (1977). This study aimed to describe children’s production of interlanguage through the features, startegies used by the children in anticipating the influence of native and target language, and the causes. It was a qualitative research of SLA in English-speaking environment. The research subjects were two non-native teachers and fifteen Kindergarten I Integrity students of Bina Bangsa School Semarang. The data were obtained by recording their daily conversation at school for about three months and having interview with the class teachers. The audio and video recordings were transcribed then analyzed based on SLA frameworks proposed by Brown (1973) and Ellis (1985) and interlanguage frameworks drawn on Selinker (1972), Adjemian (1976) and Faerch & Kasper (1983). The interview result were used to get more opinions regarding the interlanguage phenomenon. The results indicated that the students produced interlanguage systematically, permeably, and dynamically. They used strategies of L2 learning and L2 communication to anticipate the influence of their native and target language. Moreover, the students produced interlanguage for some reasons. It was because of language transfer, overgeneralization, and their development of grammatical morphemes, negation, interrogation, and reflexive pronoun in the process of SLA. Language transfer was the main cause of interlanguage happened among the students.