Kleden-Probonegoro, Ninuk
P2KK LIPI

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ETNOGRAFI: MEMBUAT DATA BERCERITA Kleden-Probonegoro, Ninuk
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya Vol 14, No 1 (2012)
Publisher : P2KK LIPI

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Abstract

This article aims to show how one can organize ethnographic data in such a way that these data can “tell a story”. As a social and human science method ethnography has been used by almost all researchers of socio-cultural problems in a manner in which it is treated as something given as if anything could go in it and it can be interpreted according to one’s own will. As a result, ethnography is deprived of its own meaning, and loses its nature as a means of story-telling while lacking its ability to account for the story it produces. This is the reason which has motivated my effort to objectify in this article what an ethnography should be like and how as a social science method it can describe a socio-cultural reality or an imagination, and even can make an imagination the very reality which a thick description can bring about. Qualitative ethnographic data can tell a story at diagnostic or interpretive level. In so doing ethnographic descriptions become accountable because these are based on an epistemological ground.
RITUS RUWAT: ESENSIALISME BARU DALAM POLITIK KEBUDAYAAN INDONESIA Kleden-Probonegoro, Ninuk
Jurnal Masyarakat dan Budaya Vol 10, No 1 (2008)
Publisher : P2KK LIPI

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Abstract

Ruwat is one of the ceremonies in Javanese tradition, which is conducted in accordance to the culture’s cosmology. In Javanese cosmology, changes or transfers are considered as dangerous, and therefore a ceremony is performed to liberate the individual from such dangers. As a ritual, Ruwat is always conducted every 1st Suro according to the Javanese calendar or 1st Muharram according to the Islamic calendar. In its development, cultural agents have brought Ruwat outside its original scope. Ruwat is no longer practiced within Javanese circles only but also within public circles and attracts tourism and commodities. In addition, Ruwat is also practiced at a national scope, especially in ceremonies blessing the work of political leaders. Ruwat, which was given and practiced within Javanese private sphere has transformed to the public sphere. It is now practiced even within the scope of the nation state, which is not given but constructed. This article explains the dynamics of shift from private to public; and from sacral to profane purposes practiced in the scope of the nation state.